Rafik Kaissi’s Steampunk Custom Scooter

The Steampunk-inspired scooter

The Steampunk-inspired scooter uses an industrial chain for the backbone

Events: Shown at AMD World Championship of Custom Bike Building
Company:  RK Concepts
Photos: AMD World Championship
More Steampunk bikes: Click here

Rafik Kaissi, of www.rkconcepts.com, creates custom motorcycles in his shop in Austin, Texas from scratch by using materials he finds in area junkyards.

The Steampunk Custom Scooter called RK Chain

Rafik uses piston rods as connecting rods and chains as a frame for the custom RK Chain bike he has created. One of the unique Steampunk-inspired aspect of the bike is that the rider actually wears the gas tank. This is because the chain would have hidden the actual tank if he had created one for it.

The resulting look of his bikes is a conflation of futurist cyber punk and post-modern steampunk industrial art, reflecting radical changes in social order as seen by a marginalized loner in a dystopian future. Imagine Star Wars shot as film noir, or if Jules Verne had written the screenplay for Blade Runner. A Kaissi bike could be a prop in such a movie. They are imaginative anachronisms created by feigning a transposition of bygone technology into the future.

futurist cyber punk and post-modern steampunk motorcycle

A conflation of futurist cyber punk and post-modern steampunk industrial art

The front suspension is a half leaf spring, and it is clamped with 3 U bolts, and this allows for longer front forks by sliding the leaf spring out equally on both sides of the front fork. Rafik built, designed and fabricated the pipes, front end, headlight and leaf spring seat.
Mikuni carburator with custom intake. Vintage fire extinguisher fabricated into a back pack handles fueling duties, ISR hand controls with custom hand grips and hand grenade front end brake fluid reservoir.

Steampunk Custom Scooter from Rafik Kaissi

Steampunk Custom Scooter from Rafik Kaissi

Rafik Kaissi, who immigrated to the United States from civil-war-torn Lebanon, now creates working motorcycles from junked bikes, as works of art. Kaissi began building bikes in the garage of his one-bedroom apartment in Austin in 2007.